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My Beginings In Radio




Realistic Navaho TRC-23B


I like a lot of us Amateur Radio operators came up from the over used and over abused Citizens Band. It was the late 1960’s when I was first introduced to CB. My Grandmother and Uncles were all licensed CBer’s. In fact my Grandmother at the time was the oldest women in the U.S. to hold a CB license.  Both of my Uncles operated the Navaho TRC-23B.  

Back then folks were polite and the rules and regs were strictly adhered to. People used their call signs and the original 23 channels were quiet and open.

I got my first CB radio thanks to Mr. Eboch, who was my Jr. High School science teacher.  I don't recall the make but it had 23 channel recieve and when I wanted to transmit I had to switch out crystals. I was about fourteen years old. I was too young to hold a license so I had to get my Mother to get it in her name (KSB-5078 I think was my call).

Me and a few of my closest friends were into CB radio and had a great time with it. My handle was Submarine and my friends were: Pirate, Wizard and Flaming Arrow. Our home channel was 11.

Once I got into my twenties CB started to change and not for the best. The band became crowded even with the addition of channels 24 to 40 and SSB. It soon became where every other word was “F” this and “F” that. People’s coaxial cable were being cut or pinned. It quickly became no fun anymore.

The question then was where to go next? Ham radio was the answer. My two best buddies where the first to be licensed then I soon also became licensed in 1985. I still have to thank my examiner for helping me with the code test.

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